Put your adult patients with IBS-D on

A short path to lasting relief

Just 2 weeks of XIFAXAN provided up to 6 months of significant relief from abdominal pain and diarrhea in adults with IBS-D1*†‡

*Patients who experience recurrence can be retreated up to 2 times.1

Median of 10 weeks (range of 6 to 24 weeks).1

Click here to see TARGET 3 Study Design.

Gut dysbiosis and IBS-D

 

Look up insurance coverage

 

Instant Savings Card available

 

Resources for practice & patients

 

#1 prescribed medication approved for IBS-D2

Based on aggregated total of all prescribers as of December 2020.

Badge
 

XIFAXAN was given a strong recommendation§ to treat global IBS-D symptoms in the 2020 ACG Clinical Guideline on Managing IBS3||

||Based on a moderate quality of evidence

  • ACG=American College of Gastroenterology
  • §Strength of recommendation: Strong=Most patients should
  • receive the recommended course of action; Conditional=Many
  • patients should have this recommended course of action, but
  • different choices may be appropriate for some patients.
  • Summary of quality of evidence:
  • High=The estimate of effect is unlikely to change with new data.
  • Moderate;
  • Low;
  • Very low=Estimate of effect is very uncertain.

IBS-D = irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea

INDICATIONS

XIFAXAN® (rifaximin) 550 mg tablets are indicated for the reduction in risk of overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE) recurrence in adults and for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) in adults.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
  • XIFAXAN is contraindicated in patients with a hypersensitivity to rifaximin, rifamycin antimicrobial agents, or any of the components in XIFAXAN. Hypersensitivity reactions have included exfoliative dermatitis, angioneurotic edema, and anaphylaxis.
  • Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with use of nearly all antibacterial agents, including XIFAXAN, and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis. If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, ongoing antibiotic use not directed against C. difficile may need to be discontinued.